Bookmark and Share Home   »  WFP In Your Area  »  Southwest

58 congresspersons sign Dear Colleague letter concerning Honduras' Afro-Indigenous populations.

spanish version below


Rep. Johnson, 57 colleagues call for investigation into DEA-related killings in Honduras

Members call for review of counter-drug operations affecting Afro-Indigenous communities

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Rep. Hank Johnson (GA-04) and 57 colleagues sent a letter today to Secretary of State John Kerry and Attorney General Eric Holder calling for the investigation of alleged abuses by Honduran security forces and the possible role DEA agents played in a shooting incident that led to the tragic death of four indigenous villagers on the Patuca River in northeastern Honduras.

The State Department and the DEA have acknowledged involvement in the May 11, 2012, incident. A pregnant woman and a 14-year-old boy were among the four villagers killed. Several other innocent bystanders were injured.

Johnson and his colleagues are urging these U.S. government agencies to “press ahead with a full investigation to better determine exactly what occurred and what role was played by U.S. agents,” as “official inquiries into the matter have been perfunctory, and deeply flawed.”

They also voiced their concern regarding the worsening human rights situation of Afro-indigenous communities since the June 2009 military coup in Honduras. These communities have been hit particularly hard by drug-related violence from both drug-traffickers and U.S.-backed drug war in Honduras. 

“The rate of impunity of alleged abuses perpetrated by state security forces has risen to unprecedented heights” and consequently, they strongly recommend “a review on the implementation of counternarcotics operations carried out by our government in Honduras taking into account the unique conditions and high vulnerability of Afro-descendent and Indigenous communities,” the letter states.

The text of the letter to Sec. Kerry. Mr. Holder received the same letter:

January 30, 2013

The Honorable John Kerry
Secretary of State
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20520

Dear Secretary Kerry:

We write to express our concern regarding the grave human rights situation in Honduras, and in particular the dire situation of Afro-Indigenous Hondurans in the aftermath of the June 2009 military coup. 

We request a thorough and credible investigation on the tragic killings of May 11 in Ahuas to determine what exactly occurred and what role, if any, was played by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents.  We also call for an immediate investigation into alleged abuses perpetrated by Honduran police and military officials in the country.

We are troubled to hear of the threats and repression targeting Afro-Hondurans who have bravely voiced their alarm over the steady deterioration of democracy in their country.  We are also concerned regarding acts of violence and intimidation against Afro-Indigenous people defending their historic land rights.  We are particularly disturbed to learn of the effects of a militarized counternarcotics policy on Afro-Honduran communities, and the participation of U.S. agents in operations that have led to the deaths of Afro-indigenous civilians.

On May 11, 2012, four Afro-Indigenous villagers, including a 14-year-old boy, were killed during the course of a drug interdiction raid in Ahuas, Honduras.  Three others were seriously wounded.   At least ten U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents participated in the mission as members of a Foreign-Deployed Advisory Support Team (FAST), a DEA unit first created in 2005 in Afghanistan.  According to the New York Times, Honduran police agents that were part of the May 11 operation “told government investigators that they took their orders from the D.E.A.”

We understand that this tragic incident has been extremely traumatic for the otherwise peaceful and tightly knit community of Ahuas.  Although Honduran human rights groups and international organizations such as Human Rights Watch have demanded that U.S. and Honduran authorities conduct a thorough and impartial investigation of this incident, the investigation has not been properly conducted.   For instance, official inquiries into the matter have been perfunctory, and deeply flawed.  Credible testimony indicates that the victims were innocent bystanders and not drug traffickers.  As Honduran authorities have yet to address the issue, our government should press ahead with a full investigation to better determine exactly what occurred and what role was played by U.S. agents.

On June 22, the Fraternal Organization of Black People of Honduras (OFRANEH), one of the most prominent groups representing Afro-Indigenous Hondurans, objected to what it views to be racially biased, "outrageous and dangerous” statements given to the New York Times and the Washington Post by U.S. officials following the May 11 killings.  OFRANEH claims U.S. officials made unsubstantiated accusations of drug trafficking against the entire Afro-indigenous communities in the Moskitia region of Honduras.

OFRANEH states that since the coup, drug traffickers have been increasingly targeting Afro-Indigenous communities, claiming their traditional lands, and killing those who stand in their way.  Human rights groups confirm that the Honduran judiciary has done little to defend the basic rights of these communities.  For instance, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States has ordered the State of Honduras to cease and desist from approving any title transfers on land in the Afro-Indigenous community of Triunfo de la Cruz in order to protect its vulnerable population from attacks by drug traffickers anxious to secure access to the Caribbean.  Currently, many more Afro-Indigenous communities seek similar protection.  We note that, even in this context, Afro descendent and Indigenous leaders assert that the U.S. -backed drug war in Honduras hurts their communities.

In addition, since the country’s June 2009 military coup, according to numerous reports, the rate of impunity of alleged abuses perpetrated by state security forces has risen to unprecedented heights.  According to Honduras’ leading human rights organization, the Committee of Families of the Detained and Disappeared in Honduras (COFADEH), over the last three years, more than ten thousand complaints have been filed regarding police and military abuses, very  few of which have been investigated.  Furthermore, State security forces are also directly carrying out repression against government critics. For instance, Afro-indigenous leader, Miriam Miranda, president of OFRANEH, was physically attacked and arrested by a departmental police chief in May 2011.

Finally, we strongly recommend a review on the implementation of counternarcotics operations carried out by our government in Honduras taking into account the unique conditions and high vulnerability of Afro-descendent and indigenous communities, who are disproportionately affected by drug trafficking activities.

Sincerely,


1.      Johnson (D-GA)
2.      Conyers (D-MI)
3.      Meeks (D-NY)
4.      Bass (D-CA)
5.      McGovern (D-MA)
6.      Lee (D-CA)
7.      Farr (D-CA)
8.      Gutierrez (D-IL)
9.      Honda (D-CA)
10.  Lewis (D-GA)
11.  Rush (D-IL)
12.  DeFazio (D-OR)
13.  Wilson (D-FL)
14.  Schakowsky (D-IL)
15.  Jackson-Lee (D-TX)
16.  Davis (D-IL)
17.  Clay (D-MO)
18.  Markey (D-MA)
19.  Grijalva (D-AZ)
20.  Rangel (D-NY)
21.  Polis (D,CO)
22.  Tierney (D-MA)
23.  Cleaver (D-MO)
24.  Clarke (D-NY)
25.  Serrano (D-NY)
26.  Peters (D-MI)
27.  Eshoo (D-CA)
28.  Cicilline (D-RI)
29.  Tonko (D-NY)
30.  Fattah (D-PA)
31.  Speier (D-CA)
32.  Capuano (D-MA)
33.  DeLauro (D-CT)
34.  Langevin (D-RI)
35.  Miller (D-CA)
36.  Michaud (D-ME)
37.  Lofgren (D-CA)
38.  Waters (D-CA)
39.  Matusi (D-CA)
40.  Moran (D-VA)
41.  Welsh (D-VT)
42.  Holmes-Norton (D-DC)
43.  Maloney (D-NY)
44.  Foster (D-IL)
45.  Blumenauer (D-OR)
46.  Capps (D-CA)
47.  Ellison (D-MN)
48.  Kaptur (D-OH)
49.  Hastings (D-FL)
50.  Yarmuth (D-KY)
51.  Slaughter (D-NY)
52.  Pingree (D-ME)
53.  Edwards (D-MD)
54.  McDermott (D-WA)
55.  Green (D-TX)
56.  Pastor (D-AZ)
57.  Price (D-NC)
58.  Van Hollen (D-MD)

Spanish version

Jan. 30, 2013

Rep. Johnson y 57 otros congresistas hacen llamado para una investigación de asesinatos relacionados con la DEA en Honduras

Congresistas hacen llamado para análisis de operaciones anti-drogas afectando a comunidades afro-indígenas

WASHINGTON, D.C.- El representante Hank Johnson (GA-04) y 57 colegas mandaron hoy una carta a el Secretario de Estado, John Kerry y al Fiscal General Eric Holder pidiéndo una investigación sobre supuestos abusos por fuerzas de seguridad hondureñas y el posible papel jugado por agentes de la  Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) en un incidente que resultó en la trágica muerte de cuatro indígenas en el Río Patuca en el noreste de Honduras.

El Departamento de Estado y la DEA han reconocido su participación en el incidente del 11 de mayo de 2012. Una mujer embarazada y un niño de 14 años fueron entre los muertos. Varias otras personas inocentes fueron heridas.

Johnson y sus colegas están instando al gobierno estadounidense a que “avance con una investigación completa para mejor determinar exactamente lo que ocurrió y que papel fue jugado por agentes de Estado Unidos,” ya que “investigaciones oficiales sobre el tema  han sido perfunctorias y profundamente falladas.”

También hicieron saber su preocupación en cuanto a la situación de derechos humanos que viene empeorando para comunidades afro-indígenas desde el golpe militar de junio de 2009 en Honduras. Estas comunidades han sido fuertemente golpeadas por violencia relacionada al tráfico de drogas y a la guerra anti-droga en Honduras apoyada por Estados Unidos.

“la tasa de impunidad en los casos donde las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado han cometido presuntos abusos se ha elevado a niveles sin precedentes.  ---“ y consecuentemente, se les recomienda hacer “una evaluación de las operaciones en contra del narcotráfico realizadas por el Gobierno de EE.UU. en Honduras, teniendo en cuenta las condiciones singulares y la alta vulnerabilidad de las comunidades afro-indígenas“ dice la carta.

El texto de la carta:

January 30, 2013

Estimado Secretario Kerry / Estimado Fiscal Gerente Holder:

Nos dirigimos a usted para expresar nuestra preocupación ante la grave situación de derechos humanos en Honduras, en particular la situación dramática de los hondureños afro-indígenas desde el golpe militar de junio de 2009.  Solicitamos una investigación exhaustiva y fiable de los asesinatos trágicos del 11 de mayo en Ahuas para determinar exactamente lo que ocurrió y qué papel tuvo la Administración de control de drogas de los EE.UU. (Drug Enforcement Agency—DEA), si es que tuvo alguno.  También pedimos una investigación inmediata sobre los presuntos abusos cometidos por la policía hondureña y por militares en ese país.

Nos preocupa enterarnos de amenazas y represión dirigidas a afro-hondureños que han estado advirtiendo valiosamente sobre el deterioro constante de la democracia en su país.  También estamos preocupados con respecto a los actos de violencia e intimidación contra los afro-indígenas que defienden derechos históricos sobre sus tierras.  Nos preocupa particularmente los efectos, en las comunidades afro-hondureñas, de una política de lucha contra el narcotráfico que sea de carácter militar, y de la participación de agentes estadounidenses en operaciones que han resultado en la muerte de civiles afro-indígenas.

El 11 de mayo de 2012, cuatro campesinos afro-indígenas, entre ellos un niño de 14 años, fueron matados en el transcurso de una operación antidrogas en Ahuas, Honduras.  Otras tres personas fueron gravemente heridas.  Por lo menos diez agentes de la DEA participaron en la misión como miembros del Equipo asesor y de apoyo en el extranjero (Foreign-Deployed Advisory Support Team—FAST), una unidad de la DEA creada en 2005 en Afganistán.  Según el New York Times, agentes de la policía hondureña que participaron en la operación el 11 de mayo “contaron a los investigadores del gobierno que sus órdenes provinieron de la DEA.”

Entendemos que este incidente trágico ha sido extremadamente traumático para la comunidad tranquila y unida de Ahuas.  Aunque grupos hondureños de derechos humanos y organizaciones internacionales como Human Rights Watch han exigido que las autoridades estadounidenses y hondureñas conduzcan una investigación exhaustiva e imparcial sobre este incidente, la investigación no ha sido realizada adecuadamente.  Por ejemplo, las investigaciones oficiales sobre el incidente han sido superficiales y deficientes.  Testimonios creíbles indican que las víctimas eran personas inocentes y no narcotraficantes.  Dado que las autoridades hondureñas no han realmente abordado este tema, nuestro gobierno debe seguir adelante con una investigación exhaustiva para determinar exactamente qué fue lo que ocurrió y cuál fue el papel desempeñado por agentes estadounidenses.

El 22 de junio, la Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña (OFRANEH), uno de los grupos más importantes representando a hondureños afro-indígenas, se opuso a declaraciones de funcionarios estadounidenses publicados en el New York Times y el Washington Post días después de las matanzas del 11 de mayo considerándoles  prejuiciosas del punto de vista racial y “escandalosas y peligrosas.”  OFRANEH afirma que funcionarios estadounidenses hicieron acusaron falsamente a comunidades afro-indígenas en La Moskitia de estar involucradas en el narcotráfico.

OFRANEH afirma que desde que ocurrió el golpe de Estado las comunidades afro-indígenas han sido victimizadas por los narcotráficantes, reclamando sus tierras tradicionales, y matando a aquellos que interfieren con ellos.  Grupos de derechos humanos confirman que el sistema judicial hondureño ha hecho poco para defender los derechos fundamentales de estas comunidades.  Por ejemplo, la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos de la Organización de los Estados Americanos ha ordenado que el Estado de Honduras cese la aprobación de transferencias de títulos de tierra en la comunidad afro-indígena de Triunfo de la Cruz, con el fin de proteger su población, que es vulnerable a los ataques de narcotraficantes que desean obtener el acceso al Caribe.  Actualmente, muchas otras comunidades afro-indígenas buscan protecciones similares.  Tomamos nota de que, incluso en este contexto, los líderes afro-descendientes e indígenas afirman que la guerra contra las drogas en Honduras, apoyado por los EE.UU., perjudica a sus comunidades.  

Además, desde el golpe militar de junio de 2009, según numerosos informes, la tasa de impunidad en los casos donde las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado han cometido presuntos abusos se ha elevado a niveles sin precedentes.  Según el Comité de Familiares de Detenidos Desaparecidos en Honduras (COFADEH), una de las organizaciones de derechos humanos más importantes de Honduras, en los últimos tres años más de diez mil denuncias se han presentado en relación con abusos cometidos por la policía y los militares, pocos de los cuales han sido investigados.  Además, hay represión en contra de críticos del gobierno por las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado.  Por ejemplo, Miriam Miranda, una líder afro-indígena y dirigente de OFRANEH, fue agredida y detenida por un jefe de policía departamental en mayo de 2011.

Por último, recomendamos una evaluación de las operaciones en contra del narcotráfico realizadas por el Gobierno de EE.UU. en Honduras, teniendo en cuenta las condiciones singulares y la alta vulnerabilidad de las comunidades afro-indígenas, que se ven desproporcionadamente afectadas por las actividades de tráfico de drogas.

Atentamente,


1.      Johnson (D-GA)
2.      Conyers (D-MI)
3.      Meeks (D-NY)
4.      Bass (D-CA)
5.      McGovern (D-MA)
6.      Lee (D-CA)
7.      Farr (D-CA)
8.      Gutierrez (D-IL)
9.      Honda (D-CA)
10.  Lewis (D-GA)
11.  Rush (D-IL)
12.  DeFazio (D-OR)
13.  Wilson (D-FL)
14.  Schakowsky (D-IL)
15.  Jackson-Lee (D-TX)
16.  Davis (D-IL)
17.  Clay (D-MO)
18.  Markey (D-MA)
19.  Grijalva (D-AZ)
20.  Rangel (D-NY)
21.  Polis (D,CO)
22.  Tierney (D-MA)
23.  Cleaver (D-MO)
24.  Clarke (D-NY)
25.  Serrano (D-NY)
26.  Peters (D-MI)
27.  Eshoo (D-CA)
28.  Cicilline (D-RI)
29.  Tonko (D-NY)
30.  Fattah (D-PA)
31.  Speier (D-CA)
32.  Capuano (D-MA)
33.  DeLauro (D-CT)
34.  Langevin (D-RI)
35.  Miller (D-CA)
36.  Michaud (D-ME)
37.  Lofgren (D-CA)
38.  Waters (D-CA)
39.  Matusi (D-CA)
40.  Moran (D-VA)
41.  Welsh (D-VT)
42.  Holmes-Norton (D-DC)
43.  Maloney (D-NY)
44.  Foster (D-IL)
45.  Blumenauer (D-OR)
46.  Capps (D-CA)
47.  Ellison (D-MN)
48.  Kaptur (D-OH)
49.  Hastings (D-FL)
50.  Yarmuth (D-KY)
51.  Slaughter (D-NY)
52.  Pingree (D-ME)
53.  Edwards (D-MD)
54.  McDermott (D-WA)
55.  Green (D-TX)
56.  Pastor (D-AZ)
57.  Price (D-NC)
58.  Van Hollen (D-MD)

twitter-iconFaceBook-iconblogspot_iconYoutube-icon